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Sell ​​many different GPS jammer systems

Perfectjammer 2020-12-02

vehicle cell phone jammer

NATO countries have long been aware of Russian electronic warfare activities, especially the increasing number of Russian GPS jammers and deception systems. Some of these have been proven in Syria and Ukraine, and Russia believes that it uses complaints of interference or deception as free advertising for the device. Russian gps jammer have certain military uses, but they also attract non-military customers. For example, Russia started selling a new portable GPS jamming system called Pole 21 in 2016. The system is special because a single Pole 21 unit can be installed on an existing cell phone tower (or separately on a portable signal tower). Each Pole 21 device can output 20 watts of power and can output interference signals from GPS (and similar GLONASS, Galileo and Beidou systems) to 80 kilometers away. Pole 21 is also designed as a backup GSM transmitter for commands from nearby Pole 21 units.

The Russians said that in this way, a wide area can be quickly protected from GPS-guided missiles and bombs and the GPS system of the vehicle is turned off. The Russians acknowledge that Pole 21 will also weaken all commercial GPS equipment in the affected area. The biggest problem with Pole 21 is that since the mid-1990s, Russia has been developing and selling many different GPS jammer systems, which proved to be ineffective in combat. Russian companies have been producing such jammers because they have a market. The Russians acknowledge that Pole 21 will also weaken all commercial GPS equipment in the affected area. The biggest problem with Pole 21 is that since the mid-1990s, Russia has been developing and selling many different GPS jamming systems, which proved to be ineffective in combat. Russian companies have been producing such jammers because they have a market. The Russians acknowledge that Pole 21 will also weaken all commercial GPS equipment in the affected area. The biggest problem with Pole 21 is that since the mid-1990s, Russia has been developing and selling many different GPS jammer systems, which proved to be ineffective in combat. Russian companies have been producing such jammers because they have a market.

Russians’ interest in GPS jammers was first publicized in the early 1990s, when a private Russian company AviaConversia was established to develop cheap, lightweight and reliable GPS jammers. By 1997, the company had provided four different types of GPS jammers (about $4,000 each) to commercial and military customers. The gears only consume 4 to 8 watts, which makes them difficult to find and blow up. It is advertised that these jammers can effectively prevent GPS signals from reaching 150-200 kilometers, depending on the terrain. These jammers can drain the battery and weigh between 8 kg (18 lb) and 12 kg (26 lb) without battery. When running, the jammer consumes less than 25 watts.

By the mid-1990s, plans to build their own GPS jammers appeared on the Internet using commercially available parts that cost less than one hundred dollars. Need welding skills. Soon, similar assembly units will be available on the Internet for as low as $40. At the same time, American GPS experts pointed out that for most military GPS receivers, these jammers do not have enough power to interfere with GPS, but they may interfere with many commercial products, especially consumer products. The US Air Force later revealed that this was the case. In 2003, Iraq’s attempt to use AviaConversia jammers against the US GPS guided bombs failed, which proved this point.

By 2002, AviaConversia had disappeared, apparently focusing on new Russian military interference operations. In the 1990s, AviaConversia established many contacts with the Russian Armed Forces and hinted that its interference source was working. After 2001, experiments conducted by the U.S. Department of Defense found that cheap jammers did not work well, and large jammers made of off-the-shelf components costing about $10,000 were basically ineffective for military-grade GPS guidance systems. At the same time, the U.S. Department of Defense has been building and testing GPS jammer detectors and guidance systems that are sensitive enough to guide missiles to any active jammers.

By 2010, the U.S. Department of Defense had spent a lot of money developing anti-jamming alternatives or backups for GPS (depending on who it was talking to). The best option is the improved INS, which has been around for nearly a century, but since the 1960s, it has become smaller, cheaper, and more reliable, and so have electronic components. Basically, INS uses three gyroscopes and three accelerometers to continuously measure changes in direction and speed. In this way, the INS will always know its position relative to its initial starting point (it can be initially obtained by undisturbed GPS or older methods). Micro INS equipment has long been a backup for GPS guided weapons. However, although GPS guidance can land bombs or missiles within 10 meters (32 feet) of the target, INS can only achieve an accuracy of 30 meters. Another advantage of GPS is that there is no need to enter its exact location after INS is turned on. On the bright side, this means that INS will not be stuck or cheated. These miniature gyroscopes and accelerometers have become the standard configuration of many smart phones, not only can detect direction, but also can detect movement. The use of this technology by smartphone manufacturers has led to cheaper and more reliable designs, which proved to be very useful for GPS military INS backup.

Mobile jammers can be used in various situations Suspected of using cell phone jammers to interfere with other people's lives and was heavily fined